Ottawa Citizen publishes terrorist Omar Khadr's propaganda

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Ottawa Citizen publishes terrorist Omar Khadr's propaganda

Postby Bill Whatcott » Sun Nov 02, 2014 10:30 pm

Image
The Ottawa Citizen declined to even so much as mention the real victim Christopher Speer (picture above), or his wife Tabitha, or
their two children Tanner and Taryn who are growing up without a father because Omar threw a hand grenade at their father and
killed him during a firefight.


"Surviving every day without Christopher has been utter hell, I would trade any amount of money to have him back. Every day I think about Christopher and imagine how our life would have been.
Tabatha Speer, Wife of murdered army medic Christopher Speer

http://www.sunnewsnetwork.ca/video/3865499072001
Excellent commentary from Sun News' Ezra Levant on this propaganda piece.

Here is the propaganda piece obviously not written by Omar Khadr (it is probably written by his lawyers, Omar's writing skills just aren't this good). This pro-Khadr op-ed was run the same day as a funeral was being held for Canadian soldier Cpl. Nathan Cirillo who was murdered by one of Omar's terrorist buddies. This piece is an excellent reason for every Canadian to detest the mainstream left media which is doing what it can to undermine this nation and make it stink. The propaganda piece doesn't even mention Christopher Speer who was the victim of Omar Khadr's hand grenade. I don't think Ezra mentioned Omar Khadr is seeking 10 million dollars compensation for suffering alleged "Charter violations" while in US custody for murdering Speer.
Bill Whatcott

Misguided security laws take a human toll
Omar Khadr
Published on: October 28, 2014
http://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/ ... human-toll

Ten years ago the Canadian government established a judicial inquiry into the case of Maher Arar. That inquiry, over the course of more than two years of ground-breaking work, examined how Canada’s post-Sept. 11 security practices led to serious human rights violations, including torture.

At that same time, 10 years ago and far away from a Canadian hearing room, I was mired in a nightmare of injustice, insidiously linked to national security. I have not yet escaped from that nightmare.

As Canada once again grapples with concerns about terrorism, my experience stands as a cautionary reminder. Security laws and practices that are excessive, misguided or tainted by prejudice can have a devastating human toll.

A conference Wednesday in Ottawa, convened by Amnesty International, the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group and the University of Ottawa, will reflect on these past 10 years of national security and human rights. I will be watching, hoping that an avenue opens to leave my decade of injustice behind.

I was apprehended by U.S. forces during a firefight in Afghanistan in July 2002. I was only 15 years old at the time, propelled into the middle of armed conflict I did not understand or want. I was detained first at the notorious U.S. air base at Bagram, Afghanistan; and then I was imprisoned at Guantánamo Bay for close to 10 years. I have now been held in Canadian jails for the past two years.

From the very beginning, to this day, I have never been accorded the protection I deserve as a child soldier. And I have been through so many other human rights violations. I was held for years without being charged. I have been tortured and ill-treated. I have suffered through harsh prison conditions. And I went through an unfair trial process that sometimes felt like it would never end.

I am now halfway through serving an eight-year prison sentence imposed by a Guantánamo military commission; a process that has been decried as deeply unfair by UN human rights experts. That sentence is part of a plea deal I accepted in 2010.

Remarkably, the Supreme Court of Canada has decided in my favour on two separate occasions; unanimously both times. Over the years, in fact, I have turned to Canadian courts on many occasions, and they have almost always sided with me. That includes the Federal Court, the Federal Court of Appeal and the Alberta Court of Appeal.

In its second judgement, the Supreme Court found that Canadian officials violated the Charter of Rights when they interrogated me at Guantánamo Bay, knowing that I had been subjected to debilitating sleep deprivation through the notorious ‘frequent flyer’ program. The Court concluded that to interrogate a youth in those circumstances, without legal counsel, “offended the most basic Canadian standards about the treatment of detained youth suspects.” That ruling was almost five years ago.

I had assumed that a forceful Supreme Court ruling, coming on top of an earlier Supreme Court win, would guarantee justice. Quite the contrary, it seemed to only unleash more injustice.

Rather than remedy the violation, the government delayed my return from Guantánamo to Canada for a year and aggressively opposed my request not to be held in a maximum security prison. It is appealing a recent Alberta Court of Appeal decision that I should be dealt with as a juvenile under the International Transfer of Offenders Act.

No matter how convincingly and frequently Canadian courts side with me, the government remains determined to deny me my rights.

I will not give up. I have a fundamental right to redress for what I have experienced.

But this isn’t just about me. I want accountability to ensure others will be spared the torment I have been through; and the suffering I continue to endure.

I hope that my experience – of 10 years ago and today – will be kept in mind as the government, Parliament and Canadians weigh new measures designed to boost national security. Canadians cannot settle for the easy rhetoric of affirming that human rights and civil liberties matter. There must be concrete action to ensure that rights are protected in our approach to national security.

National security laws and policies must live up to our national and international human rights obligations. I have come to realize how precious those obligations are.

That is particularly important when it comes to complicity in torture, which is unconditionally banned.

I have also seen how much of a gap there is in Canada when it comes to meaningful oversight of national security activities, to prevent violations.

And I certainly appreciate the importance of there being justice and accountability when violations occur.

I want to trust that the response to last week’s attacks will not once again leave human rights behind. Solid proof of that intention would be for the government to, at a minimum, end and redress the violations I have endured.


I note most Ottawa Citizen stories and op-eds allow for comments by the readers on their website. This op-ed written by a convicted terrorist or more likely his lawyers does not. I wonder why the Ottawa Citizen won't allow their readers to post comments on this piece???? :shrug:
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Re: Ottawa Citizen publishes terrorist Omar Khadr's propaga

Postby Bill Whatcott » Sun Nov 02, 2014 11:04 pm

Image
Nicholas Berg seconds before his beheading by Al Qaeda, the same group Omar Khadr belonged to and fought for.
Nicholas screamed in terror and agony for about 15 seconds before dying at the hands of Al Qaeda terrorists.


"I will not give up. I have a fundamental right to redress for what I have experienced. But this isn’t just about me. I want accountability to ensure others will be spared the torment I have been through; and the suffering I continue to endure."
Omar Khadr, not talking about accountability for himself or his fellow Al Qaeda beheaders of course
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Re: Ottawa Citizen publishes terrorist Omar Khadr's propaga

Postby fathers4fairness » Wed Nov 05, 2014 8:13 pm

Bill,

Thank-you for posting this.

I found it so offensive that they published this on the same day that Cpl Cirillo (the young reserve solider who was murdered while standing guard at the tomb of The Unknown Soldier in Otaawa by an Islamic revert) was buried in Hamilton ON.

What or who is the idiot that makes such decisions?

I did see this appropriate denunciation of the (alleged - although I agree with you and bet it was ghost-written for by his lawyers) Khadr propaganda OpEd.

http://fullcomment.nationalpost.com/2014/10/31/andrew-lawton-omar-khadrs-victim-mentality/

And I thought this blog was an effective critique of the legal legermain attempted in the OpEd.

http://stopkhadredmonton.wordpress.com/2014/10/30/moral-confusion-of-ottawa-citizen-continues-with-endorsing-khadr-propaganda-oped/

Best Regards,
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Re: Ottawa Citizen publishes terrorist Omar Khadr's propaga

Postby Bill Whatcott » Wed Nov 05, 2014 9:47 pm

The writing style and polemics reeks of a well educated left leaning lawyer, not a guy who's first language is Arabic and who has not finished high school and who screams unsophisticated obscenities at female prison guards.....
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