Whatcott comment: Killing lions vs killing white & black hum

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Whatcott comment: Killing lions vs killing white & black hum

Postby Bill Whatcott » Thu Jul 30, 2015 9:35 am

ImageImage
Unborn child (picture left) is treated as a commodity, aborted legally for any reason right up to birth. This child has absolutely no legal rights and once killed his body parts are sold for research and tissue transplants. The lion (picture left) can be hunted in South Africa, but only in limited numbers and a great emphasis is put on making sure the kills are humane. The lion enjoys substantially more legal protection than unborn children in Canada and the United States.

There are bigger issues out there than shooting a lion. I doubt most people here wishing violence on the dentist have even said a word about the murder of unborn children and the selling of their body parts in America by Planned Parenthood. I should note the practice also occurs in Canada. I saw the trucks picking up the babies when I was a pro-life protester in Toronto, but of course no one in the media wants to talk about that. Out of sight, out of mind, so lets show inordinate affection for animals and forget about injustices to our fellow defenseless human beings.

Now if the National Post was really determined to forget about the daily, cowardly, profit driven killing of pre-born children in Canada, the least they could have done was cover the rape and murder of thousands of white South Africans since the end of Apartheid. I just checked the South African news today and I see a white off duty police officer by the name of Petrus Holz was stabbed to death on his way to work, close to the same time Cecil the lion was shot and killed. Sadly, no one in North America knows about Petrus Holz, because North America's media chooses to ignore him and focus obsessively on a lion.

The motive for the killing of Mr. Holz is unclear, but many of the rapes, mutilations and murders of whites in South Africa have racial overtones. This should be news, but it isn't, not even in South Africa. Actually, around 50 South Africans died both white and black due to murder the day Cecil the lion was shot and I find it amazing they aren't in the news instead of this lion. For full disclosure I myself would have happily shot and stuck Cecil on my wall so long as the lion pride that he belonged to had a population that was healthy and provided it was a legal hunt (I have concerns this hunt was not). I am no animal rights activist, but I believe baiting animals out of national parks should be illegal, but I digress.

No doubt many will be outraged that I support big cat hunting (in a sustainable and regulated regime). I believe human life is sacred and animal life is not. For me cat lives don't matter nearly as much as human ones do. What disturbs me about the media's choice of what to cover and their reader's choice of what to get vitriolic about, is that white human lives that are ended in South Africa daily, with often brutal racial overtones, don't matter at all. Worse yet, when you look at the coverage of all human death in South Africa (compared to the coverage for a lion), it looks like neither white nor black lives matter much.

What a sad commentary about modern western journalissm when all the media can do is get hysterical over a dead South African lion on the same day 50 South African human beings died.

Bill Whatcott

"Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness; let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, over the birds of the air, and over the cattle, over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth. So God created man in His own image; in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them. Then God blessed them, and God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply; fill the earth and subdue it; have dominion over the fish of the sea, over the birds of the air, and over every living thing that moves on the earth.”
Genesis 1:26-28


Cecil the lion’s shooting death and the premium we pay to treat animals as commodities
Rebecca Tucker, National Post
July 29, 2015
http://news.nationalpost.com/life/food- ... ommodities

I want to kill an animal.

Ideally I’d like to kill a chicken, the old-school way: by breaking its neck. But I’d also very much like to go hunting — not for anything big, like a deer, but maybe a couple of waterfowl. I fired a rifle shotgun for the first and only time about three years ago, shooting clay pigeons in the woods, and I was a surprisingly (and, for a first-timer, somewhat disconcertingly) good shot. I think I probably possess the ability to shoot a goose.

But I have my doubts. So I have long thought that, if given the opportunity to kill an animal to eat, any inability to follow through on my part — through squeamishness, cowardice, or respect and value for the life of the animal itself — should result in my conversion to vegetarianism. If I can’t handle the process I shouldn’t be permitted the reward.

I want to kill an animal, in other words, because I eat meat. Culturally, North Americans — myself included — maintain a significant and disconcerting psychological distance from the food on our plates, particularly when it comes to animal products: cows, pigs and chickens are patties, cutlets and nuggets rather than sentient beasts.

As humans, we feel an entitlement to cull from nature’s bounty, not because we are heralds or protectors of the Earth, but because we are its owners
Conversely, there really isn’t much reason to look at a patty, cutlet or nugget and see an animal. They are so far removed from their original form. We choose not to see or participate in the killing, butchering and processing because we don’t like it, because it makes us feel guilty, because it makes real the facts of life and death for the meat on our plates. The premium we spend at the grocery store to have our meats pre-processed for us doesn’t just buy protein, but also the thick wool pulled down over our eyes that prevents us from seeing past the foam and cling wrap packaging, and wondering whether that steak was afraid to die.

Walter Palmer paid a similar premium to kill Cecil the lion. Mind you, Walter Palmer didn’t kill Cecil the lion because he planned on eating the wildcat. The Minnesota dentist didn’t shoot Cecil the lion because he is a skilled hunter (quite the opposite: Palmer paid a guide and strapped a dead animal to a car to lure Cecil out of a protected area, and into an area where he could be easily shot). He didn’t shoot dead and skin an animal with no natural predators because he wanted to make use of it.

As humans, we feel an entitlement to cull from nature’s bounty, not because we are heralds or protectors of the Earth, but because we are its owners. We feel we are owed whatever we can afford. Palmer is the product of a culture of entitlement that teaches us that, for the right price, we can consume whatever we want, no matter the consequences or moral and environmental implications. And while the act of shooting a beloved Zimbabwean lion is not exactly the same as industrial farming, the mentality — the cognitive dissonance, the sense of entitlement, the complete disregard for animals as living beings rather than furry commodities — is identical.

Speaking to the Atlantic in 2011, Joel Salatin, the American farmer and advocate, took that idea a step further: “I would suggest that a culture that views life from that kind of disrespectful arrogant standpoint will view its citizens the same way and other cultures the same ways,” he said.

On Tuesday evening, after a day of public shaming that included an onslaught of negative reviews to Palmer’s dentistry practise’s Yelp page, the Minnesota man apologized for shooting Cecil. “I had no idea that the lion I took was a local favourite,” he said. “I deeply regret that my pursuit of an activity I love and practise responsibly … resulted in the taking of this lion.”

The activity he loves is trophy hunting, so Cecil himself is, really, beside the point. The point is that Palmer killed an animal for no good reason, and with no particular skill. He barely got his hands dirty. Frankly, I’d like to know if he could break a chicken’s neck. I have my doubts.
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Re: Whatcott comment: Killing lions vs killing white & black

Postby Bill Whatcott » Thu Jul 30, 2015 9:46 am

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Re: Whatcott comment: Killing lions vs killing white & black

Postby Doc Notgay » Thu Jul 30, 2015 8:28 pm

We're getting pretty sick of the emotionally-driven public that are always looking to prosecute anyone who doesn't think that animals are human. They go out and look for cars that have pets in them so they can be heroes by reporting them to the police.

GET A LIFE! Or start to save a life by stopping abortion. thinking2
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Re: Whatcott comment: Killing lions vs killing white & black

Postby Bill Whatcott » Thu Jul 30, 2015 11:16 pm

Doc Notgay wrote:We're getting pretty sick of the emotionally-driven public that are always looking to prosecute anyone who doesn't think that animals are human. They go out and look for cars that have pets in them so they can be heroes by reporting them to the police.

GET A LIFE! Or start to save a life by stopping abortion. thinking2


I don't really think the general public was responsible for the hysterical displays of inordinate affection towards animals that we see nowadays actually. This was pushed by the media with their hysterical reporting of perceived animal abuse cases and now 18 year olds get fed this stuff by watching Hollywood movies that humanize animals and then their schools portray humans in developing counties (but not them) as parasites to be eradicated. The poor general population is victimized by this nonsense.
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